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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the southern border with mexico. do you still feel that this is the way to go? >> people said we cannot build a wall. i said, i would get down to the tinker toys and show them. i put together a model and said, this is how we do it. we could build a mile of this per day. this puts aside the argument, that we have 5,500 miles of the great wall of china, but my position is that we do not need 200,000 miles of wall, we just do that until they start going around the end. >> is this a concrete barrier? or a brief explanation? >> when the president ridiculed the wall, he was 600 feet from the fences and the walls and the most down along the border. i would describe this as a kind of concrete system with the foundational trench, and the concrete panels, and if you build the wall up you have to have routes on either side, with the chain-link fence by the border. we are spending $12 billion -- $6 billion per mile. >> talking about immigration is what we're talking about. president obama -- if you join congress which be supportive of this trend continuing? >> the most important thing is to secure the bo
you make reference to the u.s. and mexico and house do you view the effected of things such as transnational criminal organizations and confluence of radical extremists, the movement of iran into venezuela and the fact the we have a large border that is essentially flat. >> in my book talking about mexico because i believe anomaly is shining and the greater middle east crucial to the u.s. destiny but mexico is on the same level and on the same level of importance because latin history is moving north demographically. the average guatemalans is 20. the average mexican is in late 20s. the average american -- much longer populations growing at faster rates and ours and whatever we do with immigration there will be more latin speaking people in our society. donald flynn be wrote in the early part of the 20th century when you have an artificial border where much of the southern border is between a highly developed society and and economically less developed society the border doesn't stay stable but moves in the direction of the less developed society which ultimately finds
. new mexico, joseph. hello. caller: this is a perfect segue, the chart she was just showing. obviously new mexico, we have lost a whole industry and construction. which means, that is a lot of entry-level positions, especially coming out of high school. i see so many kids, 19, 20, 21 that are coming out of high school, they cannot even get a part-time job and they are homeless. if we had a construction industry, we had to switch service, instead of new home construction, to stay in business, we had to move into a grudge just to do our work in a storage unit. host: do you own your own home? guest: i do. my mortgage is very low. it is $60,000 or so. that is what i go on it. it started out at maybe $100,000. host: thank you. guest: that is very indicative of the situation. even the we see signs of a rebound in housing, the construction industry is still getting its foot back on the ground. you are seeing younger workers suffer any long-term consequences of what is happening in the economy. even if we do recover in terms of gdp and construction, there are consequences that will continue to
of mexico. oil leaked into the pristine crystal clear waters at an incredible rate of over 2 million gallons per day. the result was an admirer of the wasteland dress a stretch of sludge and lock that extended from louisiana and florida. killed nearly all the seabirds in the region, destroyed fisheries, rendered beaches hazardous and unusable and took a once vibrant region and turned it almost overnight into an empty ghost town. wait a minute. best of what happened and all. that is what the of burma to liberals said was born to happen to what they imagined could occur. thanks to the historical drama types and the media, that's what we all fought. that is what cnn anderson cooper state his entire show on. the because he cares one bit of what the people in that region. the only visits the region when there's something in it for anderson cooper. the people who run the restaurants and hotels, they are not anderson cooper stern the people. he would not be caught dead vacationing in panama city of a gulf shores it is what depended on it. he's more of a martha's vineyard southampton's of speech can
with mexico and the civil war was a small club and so grant drank himself out of the army. no one would have thought anything of it except that when the civil war began grant vaulted over dozens of officers senior to himself who took delight in spreading stories of grant's drinking. i tracked accounts of grant's drinking to the extent that i could and discovered on two occasions during the civil war he got drunk to the extent that he got drunk and went to bed and slept off and look up the next morning. he never got drunk at a time when being drunk impaired his ability to perform his responsibilities. he got drunk once during the siege of vicksburg when nothing was happening. he never got drunk when he was president. this is a story that has stuck with him in part because it is a label. you can put on somebody and it is hard to disprove. the part about grand being a butcher is something that even occurred to some of grant's fans during the civil war, the civil war shocked american sensibilities win the war began. no one understood how big the conflict was going to become. how many people woul
] >> see the final presidential debate monday live on c-span. watch and engage. next, the new mexico senate debate between martin heinrich and heather wilson. followed by a debate between carry herbert and challenger peter cooke. before president obama and mitt romney meat for the final debate on foreign policy and national security, we will take a look back at three debates from our archives. beginning saturday at 7:00 eastern, from 2004, president george w. bush and senator john carry at the university of miami. followed at 8:30 by ronald reagan and walter mondale in kansas city in the 1984. later george w. -- leader george bush and michael dukakis. u.s. senate candidates martin heinrich and heather wilson square off in their third debate and one of the closest of the country. this race was rated as leaning democratic. we picked this up right after the opening statements. this is at -- this is about an hour. >> we will go ahead and get started with the questions, but first i will introduce our panelists. our first one to the right is the friend is managing editor. next to him is a deputy
needed for our state. we needed for our nation. we need -- the people coming from mexico here are seeking a better way of life. they are seeking worker and freedom and the american way of life. -- they are seeking work and freedom and the american way of life. i am for a package that involves everyone. it is the only way to get past this and move forward. it is so important. mexico is our number one trading partner. we talk about border patrol and many agents today. it a triple that, we're talking about thousands of agents along the border. i simply think that we have had enough division on this issue. >> great. we will move on to another question involving immigration. >> thank you gentlemen for being here with us tonight. president obama's dream act has given people a lot of hope for legal status. if elected, mr. sadler, what would you do? >> it is an executive order, so i could not do anything about that. if you talk to these young people, there were brought here by their families. they have been raised here in our schools. there are as much an american, but simply did not have a docum
taught me about education. he often threatened to set me back to mexico if i can do well in school. >> is that it's very threat? >> it was because i really did believe him. >> you do not want to go back to mexico? >> no, i do not want to go back to mexico. and i wanted to make him proud. another thing i felt was because i begged him to bring me over here, i felt that i owed him out. i felt that i never wanted my father to say, i shouldn't have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. as we enter these last few months, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove. he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. here in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground state. he has become king of the super pacs. $1.8 billion. to put that into perspective, in 2008, mccain had 375 million to spend. this is a factor of five. you're going to start seeing it come out now. the other thing that i
to john in new mexico. on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. it is a great honor to be on the c-span. i studied this report in geology actually last year at unm, and wrote a report on this report. they use words like unequivocally, climate change is real, they use words like absolutely the climate has been changed. 95% degree of certainty the climate has been changed. now, i drive a ford. and i like driving, like the freedom of driving. i do not want to be a hypocrite. because climate change is real. and you can ignore climate change, it will not go away. claiming it is an act of god will not change it. the top scientists have agreed that the ocean level is rising from melting ice around the world. climate change is real. host: here is the washington times editorial. regulationsomobiles will claim hundreds of lives by making vehicles less safe. the environmental protection agencies were on call shut down to water plants that produce af- caller: i do not know there is enough money to throw at the problems. it is very depressing to me. because i really think that there is going to
of 1997 when i was broke, broken, and on drugs. i was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from a new york publishers to write a book. a dream come true. in mexico city i had crossed the deadline and didn't have a word written and i was broke and i called the only friend i could count on at that point because my life style led me to destroy a lot of personal relationships. i call the performance artist lives in the united states for many years and the solidarity network, art and politics in the 1980s and i said [speaking spanish] >> in the village of joshua tree, calif.. there is a set of circumstances that led her, she is from the tropics in central america. how did she wind up in the desert? everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said [speaking spanish] we will take care of you and give you a place to live. i arrive in the desert and one of the first things that i saw when i rented my little shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services, hundred miles, town of 29 palms, felt myself drive
sensibility, that we are border people, that we live in the space between both the united states and mexico, that we are of neither and of both, and that we are, particularly, a people who...have a political point of view. and this is essentially the bones of the work. this will be like the bones -- what will hold the whole piece together so that not any part of the image will fly to a place. not an arm, not a leg, not a form, not a mountain, not a rock, will be placed haphazardly. it will be placed with intention. it will be placed in a musical rhythm, one form to the other. increasingly, more people are understanding that the creative act is one that begins at the very point of research or thinking -- that that is the beginning of the art. and as you look at our site over here, you can see that there's a couple of major ways that people will see the piece. people coming right in this door will walk through this part of the room, and come into the center of the room, and they'll have a direct view of the overall wall. the difference between the way i work and the way artists have worked hi
to speak out against the u.s. involvement in the vietnam war. former new mexico governor bill richardson spoke today about mcgovern's impact on our country. demi -- >> very sad. i think he will be remembered for his contributions on agriculture, on hunger, and then the democratic party. he transformed the party, the primary system, getting minorities involved. >> most people remember mcgovern for his run for president in 1972 against president richard nixon. among the missteps in his campaign, mcgovern was forced to dump his running mate thomas eagleton after it was learned he had a history of psychic -- psychiatric problems. nixon won by a landslide. mcgovern ran again in 1984 but dropped out because of poor primary showings. his words from that campaign still resonate today. >> the question is not -- are we better off than we were four years ago? the question is -- where will america be four years from now? [applause] what is the american future? what kind of america do we want to be? >> mcgovern helped transform the democratic party nomination process and to what it is today. he scale
fought and came up by their bootstraps from real deprivation and prejudice in mexico. i think it's a story he believed in, loved, but didn't feel he could talk about it, because it's about polygamy. >> let's take a look at the documentary. let's watch the way you handled it. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> with someone with a name like romney, and you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they have done, that you feel like, well, it's my turn now, i've got to pick up the baton. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it, because it involves polygamy. if the core of your personal is something that you can't talk about, because it's politically unacceptable, you will not be open with the people around you. >> is it possible in your research to handle something i'm concerned about, that's the view of american -- and the nothing of it, not that you can come to the come and make it your world, is there something in that religion along those lines? >> t
in this room but the wider american mainstream is waking up. i live in a place in new mexico where the cowboy hats and ladies in the post office saying barack obama was born in libya. when they ask what my book is about and i tell them it is and economic social analysis of why the end of the drug war was good for america, without fail the response is the tragedy in mexico and when is the drug war going to end? is not dangerous, when we going to stop -- left-wing or right-wing and televangelist. the truth is black and white. dangerous for me as a journalist with a few decades of experience, too much of a cheerleader about this particular issue. people are going to
. -- there are flaws. from "the new york daily news." dale is on the phone from new mexico. good morning. caller: thank you for having me on. i cannot believe your last caller. the only reason the black panthers were there was to make sure the skinheads did not get in the way of people voting. as far as they're being a problem with the election, it is possible. i think is a very possible. one of these days, maybe you can help us out and put an elementary teacher on exploiting with the electoral college is. i do not know why we have it. host: we will certainly be talking about that this week and next week because it is an important civics lesson. by the way, in case you're interested, we have a c-span in the classroom website that focuses on the process of electing officials. it is a free service. go to c-span.org and you will learn more about among other things the electoral college. "the new york post." another ad from the obama campaign. [video clip] >> in here, it is just you. no ads, no debates, just you. think about this, mitt romney's plan rose back regulations on the banks across the economy, me
mention. the diversification of our group in brazil we saw 26%. and mexico 12, another latino country 6%. that is all for% in the emerging market. we have roughly speaking half of our earnings. the rest diversified in countries such as the u.s., u.k. or germany. that means diversification is their kiosk pectin understanding under the resilience against the crisis. the fact of having a decentralized city area, means that if any crisis were to happen in one of the markets in which we are, we are able to have a firewall around this element of christ is, affecting by the investment in those countries but that the spillover impact. when we present to the bank of spain, we underline the bank of spain, as one of the great bear. they standalone independent said series. with the fact of having the banking operation with the largest branch of the world give us access to stable liquidity dependent on financial market. we find ourselves basically the banking obligation, another interesting feature. to the extent, it is likely about 100% of 170%, which is practically funding our assets and with a ve
by their it boot straps from real depredation and prjs prejudice in mexico. he didn't feel he could talk about it because it's about polygamy. >> let's look at a documentary exploring a side of mitt romney we don't hear often about, his family's mormon faith. let's watch how you handled it. >> the romneys had left the united states to go to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> someone with a name like romney and you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and all they have done, you feel it's my turn now. i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> it's an incredible history. le can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. so if the core of your personality is something you can't talk about because it's politically unacceptable, you're not going to be open with the people around you. >> is it possible in your research here to handle something i'm concerned about. that's the view and the notion of it. not that this is a country where you can make it on your own regardless of your background and who your parents were. it gives us some sort of mandate
, and he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school, but -- >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: it was because i real ly did believe him. >> host: you did not want to go back to mexico. >> guest: yeah, and i wanted to make him proud, and i felt that because i begged him to bring me, i felt i owed him that. i felt that i never wanted my father to say, i shouldn't have brought you. >> winner of the american book award and international latino book award, on growing an illegal alien in los angeles, sunday night. part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> here's a look at books being published. mark bowden, author of black hawk down, chronicles the hunt for osama bin laden called, the finish. the killing of osama bin laden. journalist michael dons recounts the last six months of world war ii and the beginning of the cold war, six months in 1945, from world war to cold war. >> and william skinner one of the founders of the american silk industry. a man who turned disaster into destiny. >> in master of the mountain, thomas jefferson and his slaves,
is in roswell, new mexico. and, brian, just sitting around the newsroom, we were all sort of crest fallen, anticipating this hopefully history being made. set the scene for me there on the ground. disappointment. >> reporter: it sure is, brooke. we're all about as deflated that is balloon is right now. we can show you that balloon, our photo journalist mike love will try to zoom into it. the balloon is deflated on the ground over there. that was essentially the reason that this mission had to be aborted today. once they got the thing almost inflated, it looked like it was fully inflated, the winds started really whipping it around. i would say fairly severely. surface winds that came upon, i guess, fairly surprisingly, at that point they decided that it just was not optimum condition to launch this. they brought felix baumgartner out of the capsule on to a crane where he was lowered. he's in this air stream container, we believe next to the capsule. and so the mission is aborted for today. tomorrow, weather conditions not as certain, so this could be delayed beyond tomorrow, possibly to t
and george romney's father never joined the milt because he spent much of his life in mexico because they were hiding out from the enforcement of the laws of poligamy. miles park romney fled the country, never considered joining the military of a country whose laws he found so personally oppressive. since romney men have no idea what the weight of service feels like, mitt romney was actually able to say this. he was asked how many of your sons are currently serving in the military? >> one of the ways my sons are showing support for our great country are helping is get me elected because they think i will be a great president. >> that continues to intrigue in choiring reporters. >> all of you served your church going on missions. did you ever consider serving your country by putting on a uniform? >> i think we can look at the guys who serve and say that is the biggest sacrifice. it is nothing that any of us did but we look to those guys with a tremendous amount of respect. >> do you regret that you never served? >> i look at my family and i spepd a lot of tie time at the va hospital.
retired. i have lived for my job, going to mexico in my lifetime. i took early retirement, due to that. so it is not this matter that the last four years has done this. it is been a quite a few years that has done this. ohio is definitely a republican state. i am old enough to know. i have lived through a lot of elections. i worked on the election board. i have done the whole thing for my party. and president obama -- he speaks to you. he tells you the facts. he tells you like it is. if you do not like it, that is another story. he does not jump from one thing to another and a change his mind. and i am very fearful if governor romney gets in the, that we are in big trouble. host: he said ohio is a republican state, but president obama won it pretty decisively quarter years ago. caller: yes. i was surprised. i have a friend was 96 years old. very strong republican. and you ought to talk to her today. she comes from a foreign country. we do of the honda plant, too. and that is china. but they sure have a lot of jobs here. those people are working. now you must remember, president obama when
spill, as everyone knows in the gulf of mexico. yet again, president obama was here helping the sunshine state, helping florida. this is a guy who reached across the aisle, was truly bipartisan, wanted to help people because we were in a time of need. >> you know, governor, i talked to a lot of voters in my time here, many of them who voted for president obama the last time and they expressed some hesitation, some disappointment. they're looking around, as you note, the economy is starting to come back, but unemployment is still higher here than the national average. we're in the epicenter of the foreclosure crisis. why shouldn't people look at the president and say you could have done better? we could be better off? >> well, he was dealt a very difficult deck of cards, to put it mildly. he comes into office and we have the worst recession since the great depression. what could be more difficult than that? but, you know, he had a cool head. he did the right thing. passed the recovery act. that was not easy to do. i was happy to support it. i think it's important that people realize and r
. and the easiest way to get in this country as we saw on 9/11 is either from canada and mexico. and this should be one more reminder to us that we cannot stop our efforts. >> the irony here is there's a station named after the border patrol agent who was killed, you know, in the midst of that fast and furious unfortunate program that the government was running for a while. you would think there would be extra patrols there or added safety measures, and maybe there are and i don't know about them. >> well, i think the problem is for so many automatic weapons down there, there are even grenades coming across the border. and so our broader patrol is outgunned. and you know, short of moving into armor, you can't entirely protect them. what we have to look at that border is like any disputed border, it has to be well-protected sort of like between israel and lebanon where it's impossible to get across it without the border patrol knowing and being alerted, especially with people carrying weapons. >> former cia operative, thanks so much for joining us this morning. >>> now the march to the presidenti
about the board per u.s.-mexico border, but i am certain we will not hear that is more ed than a billion dollars a day in a legitimate trade and how that helps our economy. >> i think you are going to hear a lot about the middle class. you will not hear anything substantive when it comes to folks who are poor in the lower class, and anybody who uses those words i will be absolutely stunned. hopefully jim lehrer will ask that. >> i covered the trade on martin -- trayvon martin rally in d.c.. i have not heard anybody talk about it. they seem to be the crux of the issue to buy the election. when are you doing to fight about this? >> hal are you dealing with groups like alec that folkestone not know about, who are driving legislation because it is not just alec? >> i dropped doing business with companies, and i am encouraging our members to do to the sink with businesses with which they deal that is not doing -- that is being unfair to suppress the vote or people who are not with us on the stand your ground case. we're looking at all the companies in our organization, and i felt i had to do
along the u.s. mexico border. this was just two years ago, 2010. i want to bring in a crime reporter for the monitor newspaper in mccounsel, texas. he joins me by phone here. and how exactly did they catch this guy? >> well, they caught him on saturday, took an all day effort. they had received -- the mexican navy received information around 5:00 a.m. he was in the city of nob nobeulo and theyl lthey also ca him. they were able to arrest him and this morning they presented him for the media, basically, you know, we have this gentleman, he -- he answered directly, so he's very high up in the chain. >> let me jump in and ask you too, because to be clear, from what i understand, we had fobs who talked to the sheriff of saturday pa zepeda county who said they don't know if this guy was the one that pulled the trigger, but he may be involved, correct? >> that is correct. i spoke with the sheriff this morning. this guy is very high up in the chain, he was more than likely not at the scene, but he was ultimately responsible for the acts of his underlings. he basically oversaw -- everybody a
. >> narrator: mitt's great- grandfather miles was an early church leader who had established a colony in mexico. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> narrator: miles romney had five wives and 30 children. >> they built a ranch and he's back in stone age conditions with no money. romney's father is now on the scene. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible histo
wages now and they haven't done that. and so i have just negotiated with the president of mexico; the north american free trade agreement; and the prime minister of canada, i might add, and i'm -- i want to have more of these free trade agreements. because export jobs are increasing far faster than any jobs that may have moved overseas; that's a scare tactic because it's not that many. but anyone that's here, we want to have more jobs here and the way to do that is to increase our exports. some believe in protection. i don't. i believe in free and fair trade and that's the thing that saved us, and so i will keep on as president trying to get a successful conclusion to the gatt round, the big uruguay round of trade which will really open up markets for our -- for our agriculture particularly -- i want to continue work after we get this nafta agreement ratified this coming year; i want to get one with eastern europe. i want to get one with chile and free and fair trade is the answer, now protection. and as i say we've had tough economic times and it's exports that have saved us. ex
in mexico is asking for the public's help as he searched for the life vest that helped save his life. charles gibson was one of 35 people who survived after the eric sank in the sea of cortez. after the disaster gibson started giving motivational talks featuring the red life vest that he says saved his life. last week that vest was stolen from the back of his police s.u.v. >> it had sentimental value. and it also represented the goodness of man kind, actually, because a guy named glen wong took that vest off and gave it to me. >> gibson is chief of police at contra costa community college. he says anyone who has the vest can return it to the tions asked. >>> budget cuts at state universities may be causing more students to enroll at private universities. san jose mercury news reports private colleges are reporting big increases in enrollment among both freshmen and transfer students. college officials say the availability of classes and disillusionment with the spike in tuition are big factors in increased enrollment. out of state universities say they've also seen an increase in app
country and clearing people out from other countries. 95% of the people in mexico want to come here to work, you know what i mean? all i have to say is that under the obama administration, what he is trying to create in the united states is why they are running away from mexico. host: we are talking about foreign policy and what you would like to hear the candidates asked tonight. let's look at this nbc news poll that has gotten a lot of attention over the last 24 hours. you can see the gender gap there. men prefer mitt romney 53% to 43%. when, however, prefer president obama 51% to 43%. the poll also asked about feelings towards candidates on a range of issues, including foreign policy and who would do a better job. 46% said president obama. kathleen in ohio. as we listen to kathleen, we will take a look at the outside of the debate hall, the site of tonight's debate. caller: thank you. the president and the vice president are coming to ohio tomorrow, so we are excited, but i would like to see both of them focus on the facts in regards to, for instance, iran. i follow a former bush
roosevelt invading mexico in response to pearl harbor." that's what we have here. and what we need now is a president who understands how to bring these other countries together to recognize their stakes in this. they do have stakes in it. they've always had stakes in it. the arab countries have a stake in not having a civil war. the european countries have a stake in not having total disorder on their doorstep. but this president hasn't even held the kind of statesman-like summits that pull people together and get them to invest in those states. in fact, he's done the opposite. he pushed them away. when the secretary general kofi annan offered the united nations, he said, "no, no, we'll go do this alone." to save for halliburton the spoils of the war, they actually issued a memorandum from the defense department saying, "if you weren't with us in the war, don't bother applying for any construction." that's not a way to invite people. >> ninety seconds. >> that's totally absurd. of course, the u.n. was invited in. and we support the u.n. efforts there. they pulled out after sergio de m
that, new mexico senate candidates. >> several like evens to tell the about tomorrow. topics include u.s. relations with saudi arabia and a feature of the israeli-palestinian conflict. a form on implementing the dodd- frank financial regulations lot. speakers include the former head of the fdic. we will also be covering a speech by mitt romney. he is in answer, i'll of focusing on the economy. that is just after 1:00 eastern. >> one of 10,000 homes that they are trying to get done in the next four years. these are houses that are never going back. >> one-family every 20 minutes moving out. >> these houses are disappearing from the landscape. >> 90,000 right now ready to go. >> recently 164 firefighters were laid off as part of the downsizing, the effort to give finances under control in the city. so firefighters are laid off. about two weeks later, 100 guys are rehired. when you look to find out where that money came from, it is actually the department of common security has a fund for things like that. i do not want to overstate, but that is something you want to think about. the depa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)